TV Crime Sky

‘I Was Lorena Bobbitt’: Lifetime Immigrant’s Domestic Violence Horror Airs

I Was Lorena Bobbitt, the 2020 Lifetime movie based on the true story of Lorena and John Bobbitt, makes its debut this memorial day weekend. It’s about a 23-year-old immigrant wife, whose American dream is crushed after her husband and her supposed knight in shining armor turns out to be a drunk who abuses her. What happened next is what made national headlines after police say the crazed and battered wife freaked out on her husband in their Manassas, Virginia, bedroom in 1993 and sliced off John Bobbitt’s private part.

Lifetime’s I Was Lorena Bobbitt movie delves into her strict upbringing and background with John Wayne Bobbitt, a former U.S. Marine. And it tells her story in a unique way. It switches time periods throughout the movie—from current to the past—and peppered throughout the movie, is the real Lorena Bobbitt, who makes several appearances and takes us down the road so the audiences understands what she experienced in that horrible marriage. It stars Dani Montalvo and Luke Humphrey.

This case was a media sensation. No one could believe the story.

Lorena’s Overall Miserable Life

Court documents show Lorena Leonor Gallo Bobbitt was generally miserable in her marriage. Money was always tight, and John showed no sensitivity toward her as a wife and often “used” her body without her consent. Especially disturbing was the way John “came to pleasure,” while she was left unsatisfied.

And he didn’t seem to care.

But one night, Lorena decided to end it all. John had violated her for the last time: she walked into the kitchen, eyed a carving knife, and thought about the years of marital and domestic abuse she had endured. In a rage, she entered her bedroom, ripped the sheets back, and cut off John Bobbitt’s diddly. A dazed John looked down and couldn’t believe “it” was gone.

 

With John’s p*nis (we’re calling it his diddly) in one hand and the keys in another, Lorena climbed into the car with bloody hands and sped down the road. Then she threw his part out the window. Luckily for John Wayne Bobbit, police were able to find it. They placed it in a saline-iced bag to preserve it. The alleged abusive husband endured several grueling hours of surgery to have it reattached. Today, he says it works fine.

In I Was Lorena Bobbitt, we see John didn’t give Lorena the life she desired. In fact, according to Lorena, it was hell. And for what? She could’ve lived a miserable life in Ecuador or Venezuela. No. She married a “white American soldier” so she could have a good, stable life, and have the picket fence—and the backyard—and the dog. That’s the way she had it all worked out in her mind.

It doesn’t end there. Add emotional and mental problems to an already bad situation. Now, you have a dangerous mix. Lorena did no jail time for what she did to John. The courts found the former nail tech to be temporarily insane. That hurt John more. In the years since the almost-fatal crime, John drank and abused his fiancee, according to the Los Angeles Times. One judge believed John could improve his life if he would just stop drinking.

 

Lorena also told her story on the TV show Scandal Made Me Famous episode “Lorena Bobbitt, “A&E’s American Justice : “Lorena Bobbitt: Women And Violence,” and Jordan Peele’s 2019 Amazon docu-series Lorena. I Was Lorena Bobbitt premieres on Lifetime this Monday, May 25, at 8 p.m. on Lifetime.

 

 

[Main image provided by Lifetime/with permission]


Traciy Curry-Reyes

Traciy Curry-Reyes is the founder and editor-in-chief of TV Crime Sky. She began her career as a true crime & entertainment freelance writer in the 1990's for her website, The Movies Based on True Stories Database/Archives. She has contributed content to other websites, such as Examiner.com and Inquisitr.com. Traciy also appears as a true-crime expert and commentator on TV One's Fatal Attraction, For My Man, and Justice by Any Means; Investigation Discovery's Murder Calls and Scorned; Oxygen's Snapped; FOX's Crime Watch Daily; and Lifetime Television's Killer Kids.

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